If someone published your office’s chat logs, would you be okay with it…or wince at what people will find in them?

Most of us are in the latter category. I’m not even sure I’d be okay with it! But I’m at least certain that our chat logs are clean of intellectual property and PII. How do I know that? After reading this post, you’ll understand.

What’s Going On in Your Office’s Chat App?

This topic came from an article I saw in NewsDay yesterday: Workplace messaging apps offer flexibility, require vigilance – NewsDay.com

The article reminds readers to stay vigilant over their messaging apps: Teams, Slack, Skype for Business, HipChat/Stride and the like. Good advice.

But let’s go further. HOW do we stay vigilant? How could we make sure employees stick to work-related (or perhaps I should say “work-appropriate”) conversation topics?

The article gives the following as a solution: “Firms should institute a workplace messaging policy and outline best practices to avoid abuse or unwanted distractions.” True! But there isn’t much beyond that.

Fortunately, keeping office chat to office topics isn’t too hard. In fact, we can take care of it in less than 10 minutes. In this post I’m laying out a way to not only institute a workplace messaging policy, but use human psychology to enforce it!

Institute A 3-Part Workplace Messaging Policy
First, if you don’t have a messaging policy in place already, make one. Here’s a simple workplace messaging policy anyone can use. It’s simple, only has 3 parts, and works for all messaging apps.

  1. All messaging clients are set to Full Logging.
  2. All conversations are kept in logs. If you’re chatting, your conversation is logged.
  3. All logs are included in the company’s regular backup schedule.

Okay, now you have your policy. Next, we have to spread the word. All employees need to know about this.

Give All Employees a 5-Minute Policy Brief

Informing all employees of a messaging policy only takes 5 minutes. Send them the following details via email. Or announce it at an all-hands gathering. Or send a message in chat!

  1. Tell everyone that the conversations are logged.
  2. Tell them where the logs are kept.
  3. Tell them the logs are backed up, where, and why.
  4. Employees must avoid discussing confidential material via messaging (e.g. banking information, PII).
  5. Work-related conversations should stay work-appropriate. If you need to chat about personal matters, do so privately.
  6. Finally, tell them you may use information from chat logs in customer meetings or quote documents.

That’s it!

Messaging Policy for Office Chat
You can be a LITTLE more specific than this…

Human Psychology Helps You Enforce This Policy

Seems too simple, right? There must be a trick. And there is…but it’s one you don’t need to do anything about. It works because humans think & act in certain ways.

Informing people of chat logs & why you’re backing them up isn’t just for their edification. It also creates an impression in their mind. Think about this—when you walk into a store and see one of those, “Smile! You’re on camera” signs, doesn’t it trigger an unconscious reaction? “Oh, right, better not do anything dumb.”

Nobody’s assuming you went there to shoplift or cause a scene. But the impression still pops into your head. The same thing happens with a messaging policy. When people know their work conversations are recorded…they tend to self-police.

(There’s always an exception, but we’re talking in general terms here.)

You can periodically remind employees of the policy by referencing the conversation logs. Any reason will do…here’s a couple I dredged up from our own office’s 2017 conversations:

  • “I don’t have X’s email. Is it in your conversation history?”
  • “Customer B wants to know status on their migration. Didn’t you guys talk about that in chat yesterday? Could you send me the log?”

These act as subtle reminders. The logs exist. Chats are recorded. Make sure you stick to work stuff!

Setting Up Logs for Backup

In order to fulfill this messaging policy, you’ll need to keep backups of chat conversation logs. I seriously hope you’re doing this anyway…but if not, let me give you a reminder!

backup photo
A badly-needed keyboard addition!
Photo by Got Credit
  • Server logs: Included with server backups. (If you’re not backing up servers, call us immediately!) For Skype for Business Server deployments, make sure the Centralized Logging Service is enabled.
  • Desktop Client logs: Capture logs from users’ computers by including these folders in their workstation backups.
    • Skype for Business 2016: %userprofile%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Lync\Tracing
    • Lync 2013/Skype for Business 2015: %userprofile%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Lync\Tracing
    • Web App Log location: %userprofile%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\LWAPlugin\Tracing (File name: LWAJSPersistent#.log)
  • Cloud logs (Teams, Slack): These are backed up by their respective cloud services. If you want to pull down extra copies for your own backups, here’s some help:

Workplace Messaging Policy: A Good Idea for All Teams, Slack, Skype4B Users

By now you’ve figured out why I’m not worried about our chat logs. Yes, we have a messaging policy here at PlanetMagpie. It’s more or less the same as what you just read. We’re on Skype for Business Server; the policy addresses our Instant Messaging Conversations.

You can expand on this messaging policy, of course. It all depends on how your office uses chat apps. That way you make sure they’re sticking to work-appropriate topics!

Do you use a messaging policy now? What kind?

How to Stay Vigilant Over Office Chat: Implement a Messaging Policy
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